Dancing for Hathor: Women in Ancient Egypt

Voorkant
A&C Black, 7 jul. 2010 - 241 pagina's
The fragmentary evidence allows us only tantalising glimpses of the sophisticated and complex society of the ancient Egyptians, but the Greek historian Herodotus believed that the Egyptians had 'reversed the ordinary practices of mankind' in treating their women better than any of the other civilizations of the ancient world†. Carolyn Graves-Brown draws on funerary remains, tomb paintings, architecture and textual evidence to explore†all aspects of women in Egypt from goddesses and queens to women as the 'vessels of creation'. Perhaps surprisingly the most common career for women, after housewife and mother, was the priesthood, where women served†deities, notably Hathor, with music and dance. Many would come to the temples of Hathor to have their dreams interpreted, or to seek divine inspiration. This is a wide ranging and revealing account†told with authority and verve.†
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Introduction
1
1 Rich women poor women
7
2 Changing worlds
13
3 Reversing the ordinary practices of mankind
33
4 Birth life and death
51
5 Womens work
73
6 Sexuality art and religion
99
7 Queens and harems
129
8 Goddesses
161
Conclusion
171
Glossary
173
Notes
179
Bibliography
203
Index
231
Copyright

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Over de auteur (2010)

Carolyn Graves-Brown was educated at Durham University and University College London, and has been curator of the Egypt Centre at Swansea University since 1997. In 2008 she edited the volume Sex and Gender in Ancient Egypt: Don Your Wig for a Joyful Hour. She lives in Llanelli with her husband and three beautiful greyhounds.

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