Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

Voorkant
Penguin Books, 1985 - 184 pagina's
Television has conditioned us to tolerate visually entertaining material measured out in spoonfuls of time, to the detriment of rational public discourse and reasoned public affairs. In this eloquent, persuasive book, Neil Postman alerts us to the real and present dangers of this state of affairs, and offers compelling suggestions as to how to withstand the media onslaught. Before we hand over politics, education, religion, and journalism to the show business demands of the television age, we must recognize the ways in which the media shape our lives and the ways we can, in turn, shape them to serve out highest goals.

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LibraryThing Review

Gebruikersrecensie  - engelcox - LibraryThing

I’ve never really been a TV addict. Oh, I’ve watched plenty of television fare in my time, but I’ve always been more interested in comics and books, I think, because of their permanence. TV, until the ... Volledige review lezen

LibraryThing Review

Gebruikersrecensie  - Steve_Walker - LibraryThing

Written in the mid 80's 'Amusing Our Selves to Death' remains a damning indictment of what a runaway entertainment mindset has done to American culture. Things are not better, if anything, things are ... Volledige review lezen

Inhoudsopgave

The Medium Is the Metaphor
3
Media as Epistemology
16
Typographic America
30
Copyright

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Over de auteur (1985)

Born in Brooklyn, New York, and educated at the State University of New York and Columbia University, Neil Postman is a communications theorist, educator, and writer who has been deeply involved with the issue of the impact of the media and advanced communications technology on American culture. In his many books, Postman has strongly opposed the idea that technology will "save" humanity. In fact, he has focused on the negative ways in which television and computers alter social behavior. In his book Technopoly, Postman argues that the uncontrolled growth of technology destroys humanity by creating a culture with no moral structure. Thus, technology can be a dangerous enemy as well as a good friend. Postman, who is married and has three children, currently is a professor of media ecology at New York University and editor of Et Cetera, the journal of general semantics. In addition to his books, he has contributed to various magazines and periodicals, including Atlantic and The Nation. He has also appeared on the television program Sunrise Semester. Postman is the holder of the Christian Lindback Award for Excellence in Teaching from New YorkUniversity.

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