Foliorum centuriae, selections for translation into Latin and Greek prose, by H.A. Holden

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Hubert Ashton Holden
1864
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Geselecteerde pagina's

Inhoudsopgave

A Cowley
52
82
53
93
59
Savage nationsferocity of their wars
60
Addison
62
The climate of Germany
65
Genuine patriotism
66
Hume
68
116
72
S Johnson
76
123
77
Epitaphs
78
Addison
84
The force of custom in regard to a future life
86
The original political state of the Roman Commons
92
Sir W Temple
96
A Pope
97
Sylla apparent inconsistency in his character
98
The course of nature
101
Impiety of Dionysius
106
W Robertson
108
180
111
E Gibbon
112
189
117
191
118
F Atterbury
122
200
123
Description of an earthquake
124
W Robertson
125
2089
129
Sir H Wotton
130
219
135
E Gibbon
139
227
141
E Burke
145
Popularity not to be sought nor despised
147
The elementstheir uses
148
Addison
152
249
153
Reasoning mans most appropriate occupation
154
Lord Clarendon
159
254
160
Letter to Romilly on Fontenelle
166
N Machiavelli
167
275
172
J Taylor
174
12
177
288
178
Lord Clarendon
188
13
193
E Gibbon
196
Addison
203
S Johnson
209
E Gibbon
212
Middleton
216
W Paley
222
15
225
R South
230
Lord Macaulay
237
A field of battle described
238
16
241
397
244
E Gibbon
249
Disadvantages of an exalted reputation
250
419
257
R Southey
259
427
263
H H Milman
264
Longs Plutarch
268
Proneness to look into futurity
269
Defeat of Fabius
270
J Ruskin
273
The retreat from Moscow
275
Misanthropy
276
Qualification of women for rule
281
455
282
Evanescence of ideas
288
Character of the Long Parliament in 1641
289
Virgilhis ∆neid and its defects
291
Lord Bacon
294
Hume
295
A Froude
299
The Norman Conquest
300
No man can be good to
301
Prudence cannot always command success
303
E Gibbon
306
Impatience in getting through life
307
Knowledge increases power
309
505
312
The true poet
313
J Selden
314
Of Selfpraise
315
W Paley
317
Dialogue between Benedict and D Pedro W Shakespeare
318
Character
319
Letter
320
Character
321
Character of King Henry VIII Lord Herbert
322
Familiar instances the best Lord Bacon
323
G Burnet
324
Speech of William before the battle of Hastings D Hume
325
Every mans business is no mans
326
Letter to H Cromwell A Pope
327
Mental sufferings
328
Lord Bacon
338
A Jewish tradition concerning Moses 7 Hughes
339
National troubles and personal happiness S Johnson
340
National characterits source and development D Hume
341
Reason and fancy S Johnson
342
The men of the eighteenth Century
343
Alaric accepts a ransom from the Romans E Gibbons
344
Qualities requisite for good government E Burke
345
W Robertson
346
A letter from Sir William Temple Sir W Temple
347
Spectator
348
Transformations of language S Johnson
349
Relation of the States of the Latin name to Rome T Arnold
350
Professions of latitudinarianism J J Blunt
351
Pompey the Greathis miserable death Conyers Middleton
352
Too high opinions of human nature O Goldsmith
353
Povertyhow regarded by poets and philosophers S Johnson
354
State of England after the battle of Bosworth
355
Majorianhis epistle to the senate E Gibbon
356
Virtue has not its full scope here 7 Butler
357
3589 An ideal perfectly virtuous kingdom 7 Butler
358
Character of Sir Robert Walpole Lord Chesterfield
360
Inequalities of fortune W Paley
361
Knowledge of first principles how attained
362
Advantage of the uncertainty of death W Paley
363
The happiness of sentient beings W Paley
364
The Gentoostheir distribution into castes E Burke
365
Wellingtons attack at Salamanca A D 1812 W F P Napier
366
Adventure at the battle of Naseby A D 1645 Lord Clarendon
367
The Earl of Essex seizes Cirencester A D 1643 Lord Clarendon
368
Story of King Henry VII and an astrologer S Knight
369
British Government in India A D 1783 E Burke
370
Painful memory of departed folly C Babbage
371
Close of last speech against Warren Hastings E Burke
372
Character of King James the First
373
374 Of Dissimulation Lord Bacon
374
W Mitford
375
Desire of perfectionnot always commendable
376
Letter
377
Successive growth and decay of plants
378
Mustapha heir to Solyman the Magnificent W Robertson
379
Character of Henry VIII king of England Ulpian Fulwell
380
Letter to his Mother on the loss of his Aunt T Gray
381
The evidences of Christianity J Davison
382
Proper employment of time 1 Barrow
383
Effects of a life of labour on the poor A Smith
384
Prevalent fashion of censuring public officers 1 Barrow
385
Lady Jane Grey accepts the crown D Hume
386
J Milton
387
Our capacity for happiness
388
Fitness to govern Lord Bacon
391
The law of Solon Plutarch
392
118
393
W Robertson
394
Speech of a plebeian N Machiavelli
395
Greek Religion Max MŁller
396
King 7 Selden
397
N Machiavelli
400
G Berkeley
406
Lord Bacon
413
S Johnson
414
T Erskine
416
O Goldsmith
419
Solon and Peisistratus
425
Lord Bacon
428
192
431
Addison
436
Siege of Naples by Belisarius
437
Lord Bacon
439
213
443
Whichcote
449
Lord Bacon
458
248
464
W Robertson
467
T Arnold
475
Sir T Browne
476
Lord Clarendon
479
A Sidney
482
E Burke
488
O Goldsmith
496
R Hooker
497
R Porson
499
S T Coleridge
501
Lord Clarendon
504
Lord Macaulay
512
F Quarles
513
G Berkeley
518
A virtuous old age Sir R Steele
523
P Holland
524
Cromwell Lord Clarendon
525
The art of government J Milton
526
Heraclitus
527
Ignorance of lifes great business T Arnold
528
Lord Clarendon
529
Lord Bacon
530
The lower animals without fellowfeeling
531
Letter
532
533 The Emperor Julian E Gibbon
533
Intercourse with the great men of old Lord Macaulay
534
Fortune B Jonson
535
E Gibbon
536
The disease of talking B Jonson
537
Beneficia B Jonson
538
Memory B Jonson
539

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Populaire passages

Pagina 439 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause; and be silent that you may hear: believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Ca;sar was no less than his.
Pagina 40 - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
Pagina 67 - But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of knowledge. For men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of...
Pagina 360 - Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people ; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Pagina 86 - The heavens declare the glory of God: and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard.
Pagina 103 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.
Pagina 273 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together.
Pagina 243 - Now therein of all sciences — I speak still of human, and according to the human conceit — is our poet the monarch. For he doth not only show the way, but giveth so sweet a prospect into the way as will entice any man to enter into it.
Pagina 439 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.

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