The New British Theatre: A Selection of Original Dramas, Not Yet Acted, Volume 1

Voorkant
proprietors, 1814

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Populaire passages

Pagina 266 - Angels and ministers of grace defend us! Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn'd, Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape, That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane, O, answer me!
Pagina 267 - Haste me to know it, that I, with wings as swift As meditation, or the thoughts of love, May sweep to my revenge.
Pagina 267 - Madam, I swear, I use no art at all. That he is mad, 'tis true: 'tis true, 'tis pity; And pity 'tis, 'tis true: a foolish figure ; But farewell it, for I will use no art. Mad let us grant him then : and now remains, That we find out the cause of this effect ; Or, rather say, the cause of this defect; For this effect, defective, comes by cause: Thus it remains, and the remainder thus.
Pagina 241 - Your face, my thane, is as a book, where men May read strange matters : — To beguile the time, Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under it.
Pagina 267 - I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, : Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine : But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
Pagina 259 - I shall never be able to look him in the face again, for we spoke of him to himself — at least I spoke of him ; a. gentleman like Lord Wriothesley should not have listened to me. What a disgrace it was of Frank Hall to allow me to do it !" " You should not have been so rash. Frank Hall would make no bones of it,
Pagina xiii - ... is to morals? The stage has, in England, become almost as great an organ of public instruction as the pulpit. Is it proper that there should be no law to regulate what is taught from it, except the notions of one obscure solitary individual, the reader of plays in the Lord Chamberlain's department?
Pagina 502 - Or by some violet-borderM stream Induce the calm, poetic dream, Which, 'mid the haunts of Philomel, Each gentler spirit loves to tell; ' While he, fine-frenzied, Fancy's child, Who joys to roam the wood and wild, More deeply touch'd, the ecstatic song Pours out the rugged rocks among, Till Echo, waken'd by the sound, Sends through each cave, in quick rebound, The notes, which lesser echoes bear Murmuring — soon lost in distant air ! Now too the lone enthusiast strays...
Pagina 351 - O what would 1 not give that I could read it. Dolt, dolt that ,1 was, not to have learned French, Had it been only but to read this letter. Curse on our schools, and all their Greek and Latin — They stuff the brain with musty pedantry, And teach us no one implement of use. Now here's a paper, scarce a score of lines, • That 1 would give the Iliad to read. For if it be a letter to my wife :— She knows French well. O damn th' intriguing jargon, To have all here, and not to know one word.
Pagina 501 - Chaces away black-visag'd night, The while bright Hesperus is seen, Conductor of the enchanting Queen, •Now she will dance the wavy main, Attended by her starry train; Then, ever changeful, dart with speed, And gambol o'er the daisied mead ; Anon ascend the craggy steep, To watch Endymion in his sleep ; Next graceful seek the leafy grove...

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