The Evolution of Educational Thought: Lectures on the Formation and Development of Secondary Education in France, Volume 2

Voorkant
Taylor & Francis, 2005 - 354 pagina's
1 Reviewen
This study follows the aesthetic of the sublime from Burke and Kant, through Wordsworth and the Shelleys, into Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot and Hardy. Exploring the continuities between the romantic and Victorian "periods" that have so often been rather read as differences, the book demonstrate that the sublime mode enables the transition from a paradigm of overwhelming power exemplified by the body of the king to the pervasive power of surveillance utilized by the rising middle classes. While the domestic woman connected with the rise of the middle class is normally seen as beautiful, the book contends that the moral authority given to this icon of depth and interiority is actually sublime. The binary of the beautiful and the sublime seeks to contain the sublimity of womanhood by insisting on sublimity's masculine character. This is the book's most important claim: rather than exemplifying masculine strength, the sublime marks the transition to a system of power gendered as feminine and yet masks that transition because it fears the power it ostensibly accords to the feminine. This aesthetic is both an inheritance the Victorians receive from their romantic predecessors, and, more importantly, a broad historical phenomenon that questions the artificial boundaries between romantic and Victorian.
 

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Gebruikersrecensie  - ted_newell - LibraryThing

Simply fantastic. A very careful, thorough and convincing tour through French educational history from the earliest monks onward. Makes clear the link between general culture shifts and educational ... Volledige review lezen

Inhoudsopgave

The history of secondary education in France
3
The early Church and education I
15
The Carolingian Renaissance I
38
The origins of the universities
63
The birth of the University
75
The meaning of the word universitas
88
The arts faculty
101
The colleges concluded
113
The Renaissance II
189
Educational theory in the sixteenth century
202
The educational thought of the Renaissance
215
The Jesuits I
227
The Jesuits II
240
The Jesuitssystem and that of the University
252
Conclusion on classical education
265
The educational theory of the Realists
278

Teaching at the arts faculty
125
The teaching of dialectic in the universities
137
Dialectic and debate
149
Conclusions regarding the University
161
part
175
The Renaissance I
177
The Revolution
292
Variations in the curriculum in the nineteenth century
306
Conclusion I
320
Conclusion II
334
Index
349
Copyright

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Over de auteur (2005)

Emile Durkheim was born in Epinal, France on April 15, 1858. He received a baccalauréats in Letters in 1874 and Sciences in 1875 from the Collège d'Epinal. He became a professor of sociology at the Sorbonne, where he founded and edited the journal L'Annee Sociologique. He is renowned for the breadth of his scholarship; for his studies of primitive religion; for creating the concept of anomie (normlessness); for his study of the division of labor; and for his insistence that sociologists must use sociological (e.g., rates of behavior) rather than psychological data. He published several works including His Suicide in 1897. His notion of community, his view that religion forms the basis of all societies, had a profound impact on the course of community studies. He died on November 15, 1917 at the age of 59.

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