Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub

271. HENRY Booth, Liverpool, Lanc., which he intends_to denominate Rotæ Esq. ; for improvements in the construction Vivæ. Dec. 15.-June 15. For. Comm. and arrangement of railway-tunnels, to be 283. William SHARPE, Glasgow, N. B., worked by locomotive engines. ' Dec. 3.- Merchant ; for improvement in the treatJune 3.

ment of cotton-wool, in preparation for ma272. THOMAS Don, James-st., Golden nufacturing the same into yarn and thread. sqr., Middx., Gent. ; for improvements in Dec. 15.- June 15. For. Comm. preparing and drying grain, seeds, or ber- 284. ROBERT WALTER SWINBURN, South ries, and for manufacturing them into their Shields, Durham, Agent ; for improvements several products, which improvements are in the manufacture of plate-glass. Dec. applicable to other useful purposes. Dec. 15.-June 15. 3.-June 3.

285. JAMES TARRY HESTER, Abingdon, 273. WILLIAM Bryant and EDWARD Berks, Surgeon; for an improvement in the JAMES, Plymouth, Devon., Merchants and constructing of chairs. Dec. 15.-June 15. Co-partners, being of the people called 286. THOMAS ROUTLEDGE and ELIJAH Quakers ; for improvements in the manu- GALLOWAY, Water-lane, Lond., Gents. ; for facture of liquid and paste blacking, by the improvements in cabriolets and omnibusses. introduction of india-rubber, oil, and other Dec. 19.—June 19. articles and things. Dec. 3.-Feb. 3. 287. THOMAS Elliott HARRISON, Whit

274. WILLIAM HANCOCK, Windsor-place, burn, Durham, Engineer; for improve. City-rd., Middx., Gent.; for improvements ments in locomotive engines. Dec. 21. in bookbinding. Dec. 7.—June 7.

June 21. 275. HENRY ADCOCK, Mount-pleasant, 288. ANDREW Smith, Princes-st., St. Liverpool, Lanc., Civil Engineer; for im- Martin's, Westminster, Middx., Engineer; provements in the raising of water from for improvements in the construction of mines and other deep places. Dec. 9. – standing rigging, and stays for ships and June 9.

vessels, and in the method of fitting or 276. FREDERIC BURT ZINCKE, Jun., Craw- using it, and in the construction of chains ford-st., Marylebone, Middx., Esq.; for applicable to various purposes, and in mathe preparing or manufacturing of a leaf of chinery or apparatus for making or manua certain plant, so as to produce a fibrous facturing such rigging and chains. Dec. 21. substance not hitherto used in manufactures, June 21. and its application to various useful pur- 289. John CRIGHTON, Manchester; for poses. Dec. 9.-June 9.

improvements in the construction of cylin277. SAMUEL PRATT, Peckham-rye, Surry, ders used in carding-engines, employed for Gent. ; for improvements in the construc- carding cotton, wool, silk, and other fibrous tion of knapsacks, portmanteaus, bags, materials. Dec. 21.—June 21. boxes, or cases for travellers. Dec. 9.– 290. JAMES POTTER, Manchester, Lanc., June 9.

Cotton-spinner; for improvements in spin278. LEMUEL WELLMAN WRIGHT, Man- ning-machinery. Dec. 21.—June 21. chester, Lanc., Engineer; for improve- 291. JOHN Swindells, Manchester, ments in machinery or apparatus for bleach- Lanc., Manufacturing Chemist; for iming or cleansing linens, cottons, or other provements in the process of effecting fabrics, goods, or other fibrous substances. the decomposition of muriate of soda or Dec. 9.—June 9.

common salt. Dec. 21.-June 21. 279. JOHN YATES, Limehouse, Middx., 292. GEORGE HOUGHTON, High Holborn, for improvements in tram-roads, or rail- Middx., Glass Merchant; for improveways, and in the wheels or other parts of ments in the construction of lamps. Dec. carriages to be worked thereon. Dec. 9.- 21.-June 21. For. Comm. June 9.

293. STEDMAN GILLETT, Guildford-st., 280. GEORGE, MARQUIS OF TWEEDDALE; Gent., and John CHAPMAN, Paddington, for an improved method of making tiles for Merchant, Middx. ; for improvements in draining soles, house-tiles, flat roofing-tiles, that description of vehicles called cabs, and bricks. Dec. 9.-Feb. 9.

Dec. 21.-June 21. 281. JOHN MELLING, Liverpool, Lanc., 294. WILLIAM Gossage, Stoke Prior, Engineer ; for improvements in locomotive Worc., Chemist ; for improved apparatus steam-engines, to be used upon railways or for decomposing common salt, and for conother roads, part or parts of which improve- densing and making use of the gaseous proments are also applicable to stationary duct of such decomposition, also certain imsteam-engines, and to machinery in general. provements in the mode

of conducting these Dec, 15.-June 15.

processes. Dec. 24.-June 24. 282. RICHARD THOMAS BECK, Little 295. BENNET WOODCROFT, Mumps, Lanc., Stonham, Suffolk, Gent. ; for an improved Gent. ; for an improved mode of printing apparatus for obtaining power and motion, certain colours on calicoes and other fabrics. to be used as a mechanical agent generally, | Dec. 24.—June 24.

METEOROLOGICAL JOURNAL FOR NOVEMBER, 1836; KEPT AT BLACKHEATH ROAD.

Ther:

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Barom.
Barom. Ther. Thermometer. Daily Solar

Clouds.
Day of Month

Rad,

Winds Direction of Wind Luna-
9 A.M. attch,
3 P.M. attch. Min. Max. | Temp. Var.

A.M.P.M.A.M.PM
A.M.

WEATHER, &c.

P.M.
130.200 | 45° | 30.103 46' 26°5 | 41°4 33°9 14°9 24° 7 | 10 0
Tues.

1

( Complete thaw; small rain; Even. cloudy & close.
Wed. 2 30.050 49 29.983 52 40.0 53.5 46.7 13.5 37 10 9

1

High temperature; cloudy; great depos. of moisture.
Thurs. 329.925 54 29.758 56 41.2 51.4 46.3 10.2 37 10 6 0 2

WSW

Cloudy; 5 P. M. violent squall, hail, preced. by lightning.
Friday, 4 29. 658 54 29.550 54 40.0 46.243.1 6.2 39 9 10 1

Overcast, scanty rain, generally gloomy. [& lightning.
Satur. 5 29.220 54 29.351 | 55 40.3 45.5 42.9 5.2 37

4 2

W.WNW WNW Rain at Night; cumuli,cum.-str.,&nim.; light rain, hail,
Sun. 6 29.550 50 29.542 | 52 | 31:8 43.9 37.8 12:1 29 3

wb s

Hoar frost; fine cumuli; 5 P.M. a dark nimbus, with
Mon. 7 29.725 49 29.809 50 30.0 43.0 36.5 13.0 29

w bn. Much rain ; fine loose cumuli. [rain&hail ; clear Even.
Tues. 8 30.079 47 30.150 49 | 26:1 38.5 32.3 12.4 25 0

Ditto ditto ; cirro-cum. A.M.; Afternoon cloudless.
Wed. 9 30.001 49 30.005 52 29 7 51.0 40•4 21:3 28 8 9 3

Cirro-cum.; mild and windy ; Night, wind and rain.
Thurs. 10 29.704 54 29.705 | 56 40.2 54.4 47.3 14.2 | 40 6 10

Nimbi and cumuli, with showers.
Friday, 11 29.500 54 29.525 55 38.7 50-7447 | 12:0 35 10 10 0

Rainy, damp; Evening slightly misty, calm.
Satur. 12 29.926 55 29.952 56 34.5 46.2 40.4 11.7 34 10 5

1

Stratus, dense fog till 9 A.m.; after. fine, mild; cir.-str.
Sun. 13 29.774 56 29.708 57 40.8 55.5 48.1 | 14.7 37 10 10 3

Rain & wind, overcast; cirro-stratus & scud. [at night.
Mon. 14 29.750 56 29.798 | 57 | 38.0 46.4 42.2 8.4 | 37

5

Fine, air drier; fine clear Evening.
Tues.
15 30.075 53 30•100 55 | 32:8 45.239.0 12.4 31 2 10 2

;

D Clear A.M.; Afternoon overcast ; cirro-stratus.
16 30.042 54 29.880 | 54 | 41:6 52.0 46.8 10.4 39 8 8

Cloudy in general ; Night, small rain with wind.
Thurs. 17 29.548 55 29.506 55 43.5 46.1 44.8 2.6 42 5 32

WSW.S Fine cirrus ; Evening, some light rain, windy.
Friday, 18 29•188 54 29.248 54 38.0 43.4 407 5.4 34 3 4 3

Fine A.M. ; cirri in patches; clear Evening.
Satur. 19 | 29.350 50 29.258 51 | 32:0 | 43:0 37.5 11.0 30 0101

W.NW Hoar frost P. M., cloudy with showers; Evening windy,
Sun. 20 29.850 | 50 22.982 50 34.5 42:338.4 7.8 32 3

Scud, fair; Evening and Night clear. [and rain.
21 30•200 49 30.149 49 30:1 35.832.9 5•7 | 29 | 10 | 100

Foggy, with stratus ; cloudy at night, with scanty rain.
Tues.
22 30.035 49 29.960 49 32.5 39.5 35.7 7.0 32 | 10 | 10

Stratus and mist; Night, wind and rain.
Wed.
23 29.358 51 29.451 52 36.6 50.0 43.3 13.4 37 7 4

Wind very high; scud and loose cumuli.
Thurs. 24 29.558 51 29.60052 35.5 42.5 39.0 7.0 32 1

2
Friday, 25 29.802 49 29.805 48 29.1 35.0 32.1

Loose cumuli and scud; clear frosty Night.
5.9 27 10 10 0

Cirro-cum, from N.W.; dense stratus ; rain at night.
Satur. 26 29.452 47 29.354 48 32.0 50.0 41.0 17.8 31 10 10 0

Misty and close, very damp, rain ; warm Night with
SUN.
27 29.620 52 29.604 54 43.5 53.5 48.5 10.0 42 10 10 3 2

S. W.
Scud; high wind at Night.

[wind.
28 29.346 58 29.358 58 | 48.6 56.852.7 8.2 48 8 104

4 Isw bw sw bw

[Evening, lightning:
Tues. 29 29.070 59 29.420 59 50.057.8 53.9

7.8 | 49 10 5

SW WbNSW Stormy; extremely violent between 11 A. M. & 2 P.m.;
Wed. 30 29.589 58 29.601 | 58 43:148.0

45.6 4.9 | 40 | 10 10 10 1

vari.

Rainy and misty ; stratus ; a calm.
Mean 29.709 52 29.707 53 36-71| 46:95, 41.81 10-24

[graphic]

Wed.

.

Mon.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Mon.

[merged small][ocr errors]

Ther. Max". 57.8° on the 29th.
Ther. Min. 26.1°

8th.

[ocr errors]

Lowest point of Rad. 24°, on the 1st.
Rain fallen 3:175 in.

[ocr errors]

* Coincident with the

great Storm,

INDEX.

sea, 469

ACADEMY, Imperial and Royal at Brussels, Arago, M., Questions for solution by ( cont.)
report of, 58

Barometer, mean height of the, 383
Acid, valuable, for Engravers, 326

Influence of winds on the, 383
Aëriform bodies, classification of, 126

Biot, M., on the phenomena of the
African Desert Sahara, recent account of,
330

Currents, cause of, 471
Air, when favourable to evaporation, 128

the most remarkable, 471
Alcohol, stationary temperature of, on

Atlantic and the Pacific, com-
heated metals, 172

munication between, 474
Almanacs, scientific, noticed, 417 to 436 Falling stars, hundreds of thousands

Annuaire of the Bureau des Longi- in America, 392
tudes, 432

Falling stars, 391
Arago, M., his contributions to the Halos, cause of, 396
Annuaire, 433

Lightning, 390
Astrological (note), 417

Luminous Meteors, 390
Astronomical Society, the, 420

Intensity, Magnetic, observations on,
Astronomisches Jahrbuch, 428

389
British Annual, contents of, 434—436 Magnetic Needle, diurnal variations
British, character of, 432

of its declination, 387
Connaissance des Tems, 419

Magnetic Needle, inclination or dip
Ecole polytechnique, candidates, 436

of, 388
Equinoctial line explained (note), Magnetism, 387
423

Magnetism, problem in, 388
French elementary scientific works Marine currents, 471 to 478
(note), 433

Meteorological observations, 387
Gregory, Dr. Olinthus, 431

Rain in a clear sky, 386
Maskelyne and Meyer, 419

Rain, observations on,

385
Moon-culminating stars ( note), 425 Rainbow, phenomenon of the, 395
Moore and Partridge, 417

Sea, phenomena of the, 469
Nautical, appendix to, 426

Sea-water from great depths, 469
Nautical, contents of the, 422 to 426 Sea of weeds, or Sargasso, 478
Nautical, execution and price of the, Thermal Springs : Aix, in Provence,

381
Nautical, object of the, 420

Trade winds, 396
Nautical, origin of the, 419

Winds 396
Nautical and Connaissance des Tems Zodiacal light, 393
compared, 427

Arago, M., on the Solar Rays, 490
Object of, 417

M., on the Spectrum, 485
Paris, meteorological observations Areas, instantaneous calculation of, 489
at (note), 428

Asia, Central, new map of, 322
Popular, proper contents of, 432 Astronomy, popular Course of 98 to 110,
Universities, European, 436

311 to 319, 349 to 361, 456 to 464
Universities, Scottish, professorships Astronomical clocks, 361
436

Celestial meridian, 104
White's Celestial Atlas, contents of, Chronometers, uses of, 108
430

Day and night, the seasons, 349 to 355
Alum crystals, prefer a wooden to a glass Day and night, alternation and varia-
nucleus, 300

tion of, 356
Alum crystallization, experiments in, 300 Declination circles defined, 103
America, extension of Science in, 296

Distance of the sun from the earth,
Amber, whence derived, 324

to find, 461
Ampère, M., death of, 169

Divisions of time-true time-mean
Antwerp, geology of, 68

time, 356 to 361
Arago, M., Questions by for solution, 381 Earth, annual motion of the, 355
to 397, 469 to 479.

Earth, axis of the, 102, 107, 352
Asteroids, trains of, 393

Earth, equator of the, 103
Aurora Borealis, 394

Earth, impulse given to the (note),
Barometer, diurnal variations of, 358

317
VOL. II.

2 K

12

420

iD

Astronomy, popular Course of (cont.) Astronomy, popular Course of (cont.)
Earth, motion of the, 98, 99, 107

Sun, distance and bulk of the, 316
Earth's orbit, dimensions of the, 461 Sun, light and heat of the, 349

Earth's orbit, elliptical form of the, Sun and Moon, their apparent mo-
456 to 461

tion round the earth, 314
Earth's orbit, plane of the, 462

Sun, Moon, and Planets, position
Earth, position of, in space, 311–461 and motion of the, 312
Ecliptic, the, 314

Sun, transit of the, 109, 110
Eclipse, characteristic of the, 458 Terrestrial meridians, 107
Equation of time, 360

Time, three methods of measuring,
Equinoctial circle, the, 103

360
Equinoxes, vernal and autumnal, 354 Tycho Brahe's hypothesis on the
Gravity, force of, on the earth, 99 revolution of the sun, 316
Greenwich meridian, the, 108

Zenith and Nadir, the, 104
Heavens, hypothetical revolution of Zodiac, the, 312
the, 101

Atmosphere, high electrical state of the, 78
Heavens, phenomena of the, 311

how water is raised in, 129
Heavens, sphere of the, 311 Aurora Borealis, apparent connexion of
Hypotheses, probability of, 317 with rain, wind, &c., 404
Jupiter, apparent motion of, 312

hypothesis respecting, 247
Kepler's Laws, 456

Baily, Mr. Francis, honour to, 483
Latitude, methods of determining, Barbel killed by cold, 329
105, 106

Beetle Stones, origin of, 328
Light, aberration of, 319

Belgium benefited by the culture of
Light and darkness, explanation of, science, 67
353

geology and mineralogy of, 63, 64
Light, phenomena of, and the earth's mines of, 67
motion, 318

progress and state of science
Longitudes, mode of determining, in, 58
107, 108, 109, 110.

scientific congress at, 328
Meridian, revolution of the, 313 Bell, the Kremlin, lifting of the, 406

Moon, course and rapid motion of Bernice, M. de, his chemical researches, 62
the, 312

Benoit and Nyst, MM., on the geology of
Noon, true, a mean of, 358, 359, 360, Belgium, 67

Pole of the heavens and polar and | Berchtsgaden, salt-mines of, 16
circum-polar star, 105

Berlin University, the, 169
Poles, north and south, the sun at, Bible, first section of the, philosophically
354

surveyed, 467
Problem of the heavens, 311

Biot and Newton, 404
Rays of light and heat, 353

Birds, North American, migration of, 246
Seasons of the year, changes of, 350, Boiling, or ebullition, example of, 127
351

Boiling-point of a liquid, 128
Seasons, phenomena of the, 456 Books, the best English, reprinted in
Sidereal day, 361

America, 296
Sidereal and mean solar time, 108, Book-trade of England and Germany, sta-
109

tistics of, 320
Solar day, the, 356—358

Botanical rambles near Dovor, 69, 111
Solar and mean time, to find, 361 Botanical Society, new, 321, 409
Solar and sidereal day, 313–356 Bottles sunk in the sea, 322
Solar time-sidereal time, 355, 356 Boubée, M., on a gratuitous institution for
Solar time, mean, 358

practical naturalists, 170
Solar year, the, 313–316

Bournand, M. H., on the Hour-glass, 346
Solstices, the, 359

Bowdich, Dr., his translation of Laplace,
Star, declination of, 104

296
Stars, apparent motion of the, 98 Brabant, M. Galeotte on the geology of, 68
Stars, right ascension of, 103 Bridgewater Treatise by Dr. Buckland,

Stars, fixed, distances and magni. reviewed, 337 to 348
tudes of the, 101

British Association, sixth meeting of, an-
Summer and winter illustrated, 354 nounced, 72

Sun, the apparent daily motion -of sixth meeting of, reported, 132 to
eastward, 313

165
Sun, apparent motion of the, 312

Animal and vegetable substances,
Sun's course in the heavens, 313 Dr. Macartney on preserving 152
Sun's declination, to determine, 314 Annual address, 179

Sun's declination-circle, to find, Arsenic, experiments for detecting,
314

by Mr. Herapath, 150

British Association (cont.)

Railroads, Professor Moseley and Dr.
Lardner on the theory of, 148

Reception of, at Bristol, 165
Refractive Indices, Professor Powell

on, 149

on, 161

British Association (cont.)

Atmosphere, substances in the, by
Mr. W. West, 150

Aurora Borealis, by Mr, Herapath,
152

Blasting rocks, Dr. Hare on, 149

Brain, Dr. Prichard on diseases of
the, 158

Bristol, choice and advantages of, 132

Bristol, popular education in, by Mr.
Tripp, 163

Caoutchouc, Professor Boyle on, 160

Chemical Constants, by Professor
Johnston, 150

Chemistry and mineralogy, papers
read in, 140

Conversazione suggested, 183
Corn and population, Baron Dupin
Course of the proceedings, 178

Cow-fish, River-cow, Dr. J. Han-
cock on, 160

Crystals, artificial, by Mr. Crosse,
155, 182

Devonshire, geology of, by Messrs.
Sedgwick and Murchison, 152

Earth, interior temperature of, by
Professor Phillips, 147

France, prices of corn in, 162
Gases, certain, Dr. C. Henry on, 150
General Committee, 133
Gluten, Mr. W. C. Jones on, 151
General officers, list of, 133, 254

Geology and Geography, papers read
in, 141

Herschel, Sir John, his discoveries
at the Cape of Good Hope, 164

India, Colonel Sykes on the pro-
ducts of, 162

Investigation recommended by, 354
Lithic acid, Mr. Herapath on, 151

Mathematics, new theorem in, by
Mr. Jerrard, 145

Hamilton, Sir W., on Mr. Jerrard's
new theorem, 145

Peacock, Mr., on Mr. Jerrard's new
theorem, 146

Mathematics and physics, papers
read in, 139

Mechanical science, papers read in,
143

Medical science, papers read in, 143
Members enrolled, 138

Metalliferous veins, Mr, Fox on,
154, 182

Mineral waters and hot springs, Dr.
Daubeny on, 182

Models and machines, exhibition of
suggested, 180

North American Zoology, Dr. Ri-
chardson on, 159

Object of the meeting not explained,
178

Popularity of the meetings, 181
Programme of the business, 137
Railroads, Dr. Lardner on, 158

Reports of the proceedings, 179
Reports of the sections, 180, 182
Scheme of the, 134
Sections, officers of, 133
Section A. papers read in, 139
Section B. papers read in, 140
Section C. papers read in, 141
Section D. papers read in, 141
Section E. papers read in, 142
Section F. papers read in, 143
Section G. papers read in, 143
Seventh meeting announced, 165
Sittings terminated, 165
Statistics, papers read in, 143

Steam-communication with America
and India, Dr. Lardner on, 156

Sugar from flowers, by Professor
Henslow, 152

Sessional Journal suggested, 323

Sulphuric acid and water, combined,
by Dr. Thomson, 151

Tides, Messrs. Lubbock and Whe-
well on, 144

Traction on canals, Mr. Russel on,
147

Treasurer's report, 136

Zoology and Botany, papers read in,
141
British Letters-Patent Amendment Bill,

abstract of, 74
Brussels, Royal Academy of Sciences at,

report of, 58
Buckland's, Dr., Bridgewater Treatise on

Geology and Mineralogy, reviewed, 337
to 348

Agencies of changes, 340

Bridgewater Treatises, object of the,
339

Chain of organized beings, connexion

Crustacea, extinct, new facts re-
specting their eyes, 342

Discoveries of pre-existing organized
beings, 340

Dodo, extinction of the, 344
Fossil plants, numerical proportion
Geology and astronomy, 341

attractions of, 341

outline of, wanting, 341
Globe, original state of the, 340
Humility of man, 342
Hypotheses and facts in geology, 339

Lindley, Professor, his experiments
on plants in water, 345

Mosaic cosmogony, the, 339
Noachian deluge, the (note), 339

Organic structure, simple and com-
plicated, 344
Pachydermata, fossil generą of, 343

of, 343

of, 344

« VorigeDoorgaan »