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TO THE

"EXPOSÉ DES DROITS DE SA MAJESTÉ

TRÉS FIDELE,

DONNA MARIA II."

EXPRESSLY WRITTEN

AND LATELY PRINTED IN PARIS, FOR THE PURPOSE OF
EXHIBITING

THE RIGHTS

OF

D. Pedro and those of his Daughter,

TO THE

THRONE OF PORTUGAL.

BY WILLIAM WALTON.

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THE LAW WILL NOT ENDURE THAT ITS FORMS, OR FICTIONS, SHALL
BE EMPLOYED TO WORK A WRONG."

Earl Mansfield-Burrow, 962.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR 3. RICHARDSON, 91, AND WILSON, 88, ROYAL EXCHANGE,

1830.

A. REDFORD AND W. ROBINS, PRINTERS,

36, London Road, Southwark.

REPLY, &c.

THE "Exposé des Droits de Sa Majesté Très Fidèle, Donna Maria II. et de la Question Portugaise," lately printed in Paris, is indubitably the greatest and most methodical effort, hitherto made, to exhibit D. Pedro's claims and those of his Daughter to the Throne of Portugal; and, before it, all the other publications, in the same interest, which had previously issued from the English and French press, sink into comparative insignificance. Although recommended by no signature; although sanctioned by no official declaration, this work must nevertheless be taken as coming from authority, and as expressing the sentiments of the Portuguese refugees, scattered over various portions of Europe. It is to be considered as an Exposition of rights, now vested in Donna Maria, according to the view taken of them by her own adherents, and as containing the

sum total of all their arguments, accompanied by a full display of their corroborative proofs. It is also a powerful appeal to the sympathies of the governments and people of Europe, and calculated to awaken feelings of the strongest kind, on behalf of an interesting young Princess, in whose favour the public mind had been accidentally prepossessed.

The Exposé is besides a fashionable vehicle of information on the Portuguese question, more particularly in Diplomatic and Parliamentary circles, and extends to the portentous length of 227 pages, 4to, 150 of which are called "Piéces Justificatives et Documens." The organ of the party by whom this Manifesto is ushered to the world, has avowedly laboured, and, in candour one is bound to suppose, with the utmost earnestness of purpose and conscientious sincerity, to trace the causes of the evils complained of to one source; but the theories now produced can only appear novel, bold and startling, to those who never devoted their previous attention to the subject; and to them, after all, the truth, or fallacy, of the positions assumed, most probably will be little else than mere matters of opinion.

Like most of the Portuguese polemics on the present competition for the throne, this volume is wrapped up in so much mystery; its decisions are pronounced in so dogmatical a tone, and supported by such voluminous and overwhelming authorities, that the common reader has neither the time, nor inclination, to follow and detect the delusions, spread before him, however smooth the road may have been ren

dered over which he is invited to travel. By some, however, it will doubtless be found a compendious ascription, wearing the garb of plausibility; whilst many, either interested in the subject, or by duty called upon to peruse its pages, will not stop to inquire whether they are written under the control of a healthy judgment; and others possibly do not possess the means of discriminating whether the documents, referred to, are in themselves incomplete, or defective in their application.

After some deliberation with myself, these united considerations induced me to offer a Reply; and, in undertaking so arduous a task, my determination was strengthened by the circumstance of the Exposé having been studiously placed in the hands of many of our leading men, particularly belonging to Government, or forming part of the great National Council, and I apprehended its perusal might give rise to hasty, if not erroneous, impressions. The question agitated is one of great national importance; calculated to excite the interest of every true lover of his country, and, on this account, I considered myself authorized to discuss its several bearings, with that freedom with which Englishmen are accustomed to treat matters, connected with the welfare of the community. To England, almost exclusively, do the Portuguese, at the present moment, look up for the recognition of the Sovereign whom the laws and the public voice have raised to the throne, and any thing that can retard this act of justice, or weaken the spirit of sincerity in which it may be performed, must be considered as detrimental

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