The Question as a Measure of Efficiency in Instruction: A Critical Study of Class-room Practice

Voorkant
Teachers college, Columbia university, 1912 - 95 pagina's
 

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Pagina 92 - O woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light, quivering aspen made ; When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou...
Pagina 92 - At length the freshening western blast Aside the shroud of battle cast. And, first, the ridge of mingled spears Above the brightening cloud appears ; And in the smoke the pennons flew, As in the storm the white sea-mew. Then marked they, dashing broad and far, The broken billows of the war, And plumed crests of chieftains brave, Floating like foam upon the wave...
Pagina 69 - Yet here is the text-book teacher who says, " The most important thing just Tiere is a good summary; I want you to take it down in your note books as I give it to you and learn it for to-morrow." So far as our data furnish evidence, the paramount conclusions regarding our ability to measure the efficiency of instruction by the number of questions are these: A LARGE NUMBER OF QUESTIONS is AN INDISPUTABLE INDEX OF BAD TEACHING (except in some modern language and developmental lessons). A SMALL NUMBER...
Pagina 24 - SEVENTH : The large number of questions suggests that in actual practice there is very little effort put forth to teach our boys and girls to be self-reliant, independent mental workers.
Pagina 39 - Pupil: Yes. Teacher: Where and how, Miss W. ? Miss W.: A great deal of prophecy, whether they should go out to battle was decided by superstitious means. Teacher: Yes, by superstitious means. Pupil: And what the result of the battle would be is decided before.
Pagina 15 - The large number of questions suggests that the teacher is doing most of the work of the class hour instead of directing the pupils in the doing. One reason why one hundred and fifty questions can be asked in forty minutes is due to the fact that the teacher can think more rapidly and talk more rapidly than his pupils, and so, in order to cover a large amount of subject matter, he carries the trend of the lesson through his questions, the pupils merely punctuating the series with short answers from...
Pagina 39 - We will see; hold your judgment until the end, and see. How much is description used in the story, Mr. T? Is there very much? Mr. T.: Quite a little. Teacher: For what did it seem to be put in? Pupil: I think one place the Canto starts very quietly, and then the clan gathered in the fiercest preparation, terrible oaths, shows contrasts.
Pagina 23 - ... in the mechanics of the schoolroom to cultivate the gentle art of expression . . . The only way to develop powers of speech is to give opportunity for their exercise under skilled guidance. 5. The large number of questions suggests the thought that there is little thought given to the needs of the individuals. The teacher sets the pace in his questioning; the pupils follow as a body, or drop by the wayside. When pupils become interested in their work and begin to think for themselves, it is very...
Pagina 92 - ... flew, As in the storm the white sea-mew. Then mark'd they, dashing broad and far. The broken billows of the war, And plumed crests of chieftains brave, Floating like foam upon the wave ; But...

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