The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature

Voorkant
W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1806
 

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Populaire passages

Pagina 9 - Original Sin standeth not in the following of Adam, (as the Pelagians do vainly talk;) but it is the fault and corruption of the Nature of every man, that naturally is engendered of the offspring of Adam...
Pagina 77 - Daughters; but by devout prayer to that Eternal Spirit who can enrich with all utterance and knowledge, and sends out his Seraphim with the hallowed fire of his altar to touch and purify the lips of whom he pleases...
Pagina 418 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in heaven: As some tall cliff that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
Pagina 44 - ... death, and the supreme arbiter of both ? Have you not marked when he entered how the stormy wave of the multitude retired at his approach ? Have you not marked...
Pagina 44 - ... the body of the accused, and mark it for the grave, while his voice warned the devoted wretch of woe and death — a death which no innocence can escape, no art elude, no force resist, no antidote prevent. There was an antidote — a juror's oath — but even that adamantine chain that bound the integrity of man to the throne of eternal justice, is solved and melted in the breath that issues from the informer's mouth ; conscience swings from her mooring, and the appalled and affrighted juror...
Pagina 44 - Have you not marked how the human heart bowed to the supremacy of his power, in the undissembled homage of deferential horror ? How his glance, like the lightning of heaven, seemed to rive the body of the accused, and mark it for the grave, while his voice warned the devoted wretch of woe and...
Pagina 43 - It is at those periods that the honest man dares not speak, because truth is too dreadful to be told ; it is then humanity has no ears, because humanity has no tongue. It is then the proud man scorns to speak, but like a physician baffled by the wayward excesses of a dying patient, retires indignantly from the bed of an unhappy wretch, whose ear is too fastidious to bear the sound of wholesome advice, whose palate is too debauched to bear the salutary bitter of the medicine that might redeem him...
Pagina 44 - Let me ask you honestly, what do you feel, when, in my hearing, when in the face of this audience, you...
Pagina 319 - ... nothing will supply the want of prudence; and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.
Pagina 235 - He then passed on, and left sir Geoflry standing, without having a word to say for himself. When he came to sir Eustace de Ribeaumont, he assumed a cheerful look, and said, with a smile ; " Sir Eustace, you are the most valiant knight in Christendom, that I ever saw attack his enemy, or defend himself. I never yet found any one in battle, who, body to body, had given me so much to do as you have done this day. I adjudge to you the prize of valour above all the knights of my court, Ľs what is justly...

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