The New Composition-rhetoric

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Allyn and Bacon, 1911 - 468 pagina's
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Grouping by Contrast or Antithesis
30
Grouping by Cause and Effect
31
Climax
33
Overlapping Topics
34
Assignments on Grouping Topics
35
Paragraphs 16 Introductory
44
Topic Statement
45
How Paragraphs Grow
64
Assignments on Development by Repetition
67
By Comparison and Contrast
72
Assignments on Development by Comparison and Contrast
75
SECTION PAGE 24 By Particulars and Details
85
Assignments on Development by Particulars
87
By Specific Instances
93
Assignments on Development by Specific Instances
95
By Cause and Effect
99
Assignments on Development by Cause and Effect
100
Combination of Methods
106
Assignments on Development by Various Methods
108
Means of Connection
117
Assignments on Means of Connection
119
Sentences 34 Introduction
125
Complex and Compound Sentences
126
Long and Short Sentences
128
Loose Periodic Balanced Sentences
130
Arrangement of Parts
135
Assignments
138
Means of Connection
141
Assignments on Means of Connecting Sentences
146
Words 43 Choice of Expression
152
How to Enlarge your Vocabulary
153
Will and Shall
155
Who Which That
156
Assignments on Choice of Words
157
The Forms of Prose Discourse 48 Kinds of Writing
168
SECTION PAGE 50 Combination of the Kinds of Writing
171
Assignments in the Combination of Kinds
172
Description 52 The Effect of Description
174
Assignments onthe Effects of Description
175
Assignments on the Use of the Concrete
178
Assignments on Kinds of Images
181
The Point of View
186
Assignments on Point of View
188
The Order of Observation
191
Assignments on the Order of Observation
192
The Fundamental Image
195
SECTION
196
Assignments on the Fundamental Image
198
Number and Selection of Details
203
Assignments on Selection of Details
205
Assignments in Description of Voices
208
Assignments in Description of Sounds
210
Assignments for Details of Life and Movement
211
Sequence and Grouping of Details
212
Assignment in Sequence and Grouping
215
Miscellaneous Assignments
218
Narration 71 Narration and Description
237
Assignments in Detecting Narration
238
Effect of Narration
240
Assignments in the Effect of Narration
242
Simple Incident
243
Assignments in Relating an Actual Experience
244
Assignment in Narrative partly Invented
248
Complex Narrative
249
Assignments in Supplying the Obstacle
253
Kinds of Obstacle
254
Assignments in the Kit of stacle 82 Development of the Plot 83 The Beginning 84 Assignments on the Beginning 85 The Middle
255
Assignments on the Middle
257
The
261
Assignments on the Plot
262
The Point of the Story 90 Assignment on the Point of the Story
265
Assignments on the Nature of Exposition
303
Need of Exposition
305
Assignments on the Need of Exposition
306
Common Methods of Exposition 103 Why we Fail to Understand
310
Assignments on Failing to Understand
311
Connecting New Ideas with
315
Assignments on Connecting New Ideas with
318
Logical Definition
319
Assignments in Supplying or Narrowing the Genus
322
Assignments in Abstracting Definitions
323
Assignments in Correcting Faulty Definitions
325
Generalized Narrative
328
Assignments in Generalized Narrative
330
Comparison or Analogy
331
Assignments in Comparison or Analogy
333
Reconciling Contradictory Ideas
334
Assignments on Reconciling Contradictory Ideas
336
Division
337
Assignments in Division
339
Types of Expository Writing
341
A Type Study in Exposition
343
Miscellaneous Assignments in Exposition
349
Argumentation 124 I Simple Argumentation and Informal Debating
353
Assignments on the Work of Argumentation
355
Argumentation and Exposition
360
Description and Narration in Argument
361
Assignments in the Relation of Argumentation to Expo sition Description and Narration
362
The Proposition
371
Assignments on the Proposition
373
Arguments for the Proposition based on Perti nent Facts
375
Arguments based on Pertinent Circumstances
376
Arguments based on Specific Instances
377
Arguments based on Principles Experiences Authority
378
SECTION PAGE 138 Assignment in Finding Principles
379
Assignment in Supplying a General Theory
381
Assignments in Relating Facts and Theories to Propo sitions
382
Assignments on Arguments for the Proposition
386
Tests of Arguments for Pertinence
387
Assignments on the Test for Pertinence
389
Tests of Arguments for Strength
392
Assignments on the Test for Strength
394
Tests of Arguments for Consistency
398
Assignments on the Test for Consistency
400
The Order of Arguments
402
Assignment on the Order of Arguments
403
Miscellaneous Assignments
406
Formal Debate
408
Preparation of Material
414
The Main Issues and the Trial Brief
416
Team Work
417
Individual Practice
418
Poetry 163 Introductory
421
Kinds of Poetry
422
Dramatic Poetry
425
SECTION PAGE 167 Lyric Poetry
427
Didactic Poetry
429
Assignments
430
Versification
431
Assignments
438
Figures of Speech 172 Definition
439
Classes of Figures
440
Assignments on Figures of Imagery
446
Figures of Arrangement
448
Assignments
449
Figures of Contradiction
450
General Assignments
452
APPENDIX A Directions for Written Work
454
APPENDIX B Capitals and Punctuation
455
Common Faults with Marks used in Correcting Them
458
311
465
322
466

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Populaire passages

Pagina 284 - Of hair-breadth scapes i' the imminent deadly breach; Of being taken by the insolent foe, And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence, And portance in my travels' history: Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process; And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Pagina 18 - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.
Pagina 112 - What constitutes a State ? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate ; Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned ; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride ; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No : men, high-minded men...
Pagina 166 - I shall have the most solemn one to preserve, protect, and defend it/ "I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Pagina 81 - But, his unbiassed opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you, to any man, or to any set of men living. These he does not derive from your pleasure; no, nor from the law and the constitution. They are a trust from Providence, for the abuse of which he is deeply answerable. Your representative owes you not his industry only, but his judgment; which he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.
Pagina 435 - I bring fresh showers for the thirsting flowers, From the seas and the streams; I bear light shade for the leaves when laid In their noonday dreams. From my wings are shaken the dews that waken The sweet buds every one, When rocked to rest on their mother's breast, As she dances about the sun. I wield the flail of the lashing hail, And whiten the green plains under, And then again I dissolve it in rain, And laugh as I pass in thunder.
Pagina 436 - The world can never give The bliss for which we sigh ; 'Tis not the whole of life to live, Nor all of death to die.
Pagina 24 - Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears ; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them ; The good is oft interred with their bones ; So let it be with Caesar.
Pagina 439 - I saw a smith stand with his hammer, thus, The whilst his iron did on the anvil cool, With open mouth swallowing a tailor's news, Who, with his shears and measure in his hand, Standing on slippers, (which his nimble haste Had falsely thrust upon contrary feet) Told of a many thousand warlike French, That were embattailed and rank'd in Kent : Another lean, unwash'd artificer Cuts off his tale, and talks of Arthur's death.
Pagina 202 - Come on, sir; here's the place: stand still. How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs that wing the midway air Show scarce so gross as beetles: halfway down Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade!

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