Vignettes of Derbyshire, by the author of 'The life of a boy'

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G. and W. B. Whittaker, 1824 - 135 pagina's
 

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Pagina 55 - And if a man have committed a sin worthy of death, and he be to be put to death, and thou hang him on a tree : his body shall not remain all night upon the tree, but thou shalt in any wise bury him that day ; (for he that is hanged is accursed of God ;) that thy land be not defiled, which the Lord thy God giveth thee for an inheritance.
Pagina 118 - The dead are like the stars by day ; Withdrawn from mortal eye, But, not extinct, they hold their way In glory through the sky : Spirits from bondage thus set free Vanish amidst immensity, Where human thought, like human sight, Fails to pursue their trackless flight.
Pagina 6 - Perhaps, like the great statesman of Elizabeth, may, after he has passed the humble gates, take ofl his courtly robes, and say, " There lie, my Lord Chancellor !" and in sport, even as I did in thought, amplify comparison upon the sweet enchantment. " To Chatsworth, gorgeous Chatsworth. it is but a light trinket hung to a costly watch ; or a single blossom of the jasmine by the side of the imperial rose ; or a solitary star, sailing in the wake of the resplendent moon ; or the scent of the violet,...
Pagina 19 - ... still advancing, we wound along ; every dozen paces presenting a different appearance. No sky to be seen but that directly above our heads, the zenith and boundary of our aerial view, and that was of the bluest blue. One moment there seemed to be no human beings but our three selves, the next showed us one of our own species, like the samphire gatherer of Dover cliffs, hanging in the middle air, collecting the moss with which the upper regions of mountains were covered ; two patient asses> waiting...
Pagina 7 - ... mountains, when the echoes of the brazen trumpets had ceased ; or the still, small voice of grateful praise when the pealing anthem and the loud response no longer filled the cathedral's lofty arches ; — it was all this, and more ; it was nature's lullaby from the tumult of the world ; the eye revelling in its beauty, and the mind reposing in its quietness, whilst its balmy sweetness pervaded the purest joy of sense, and all its green attractions and its lucid animations took captive the heart...
Pagina 5 - ... swiftness, through the sylvan hamlet of King's Sterndale, by the wild solitudes of Chee Torr, the rocky passes of Miller's Dale, the deep clefts of Cresbrook, and the fairy scenes of Monsal, wantons and sports beneath the eye of the Lord of Hartington, from whence its native waters spring, before it take its final way to the shining east, and mixes with the classic waves of Derwent. There, perhaps, may the Duke of Devonshire look around, and say with complacent feelings subdued from the world...
Pagina 18 - Very different was the aspect of the via terrarium we were entering, after having walked half a mile of level road from Castleton, Mam Torr directly in our front, and forming one side of the Winnets. The pathway is not broader than will admit two carriages to pass, and is inclosed by lofty mountains, the base of each seeming to cross each other, as if to interrupt the progress, broken by the peaked rocks of silver grey that start from their sides. Thus apparently obstructed, but still advancing,...
Pagina 5 - ... this little fishing-house, on the banks of the winding Wye ; which, after having run its race with mountain swiftness, through the sylvan hamlet of King's Sterndale, by the wild solitudes of Chee Torr, the rocky passes of Miller's Dale, the deep clefts of Cresbrook, and the fairy scenes of Monsal, wantons and sports beneath the eye of the Lord of...
Pagina 34 - ... rocky channel, or forces its way through narrow denies, but expands its glossy surface to the smooth banks of the beautiful meadow-land, that divide it from the base of the mountain. Two or three rustic dwellings, in perfect harmony with the scene, diversify the level of the valley ; they are shaded by the finest Ash trees that grow in Derbyshire, whilst their descendants grace the rising hills in little groups, or single trees, and throw their shadows on the bright green turf from whence they...
Pagina 20 - ... the Winnets. The difference of ascending and descending was strongly marked. The point of those rocks, that almost rose above our sight as we went upwards, seemed, on our return, to lie beneath our feet. The last opening is superlatively fine ; two grand and pointed rocks forming its side skreens, and admitting the sudden and, bursting sight of Hope Dale, with far distant views, ' vyhere the purple mountains lie...

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