The Gay]grey Moose: Essays on the Ecologies and Mythologies of Canadian Poetry, 1690-1990

Voorkant
University of Ottawa Press, 1992 - 328 pagina's
The Gay]Grey Moose is a collection of essays presenting a comprehensive view of English poetry in Canada from the early colonial period to the Post-Modern era. From a wide range of poets, this book provides fresh contexts for viewing and discussing three centuries of English Canadian poetry. Both national and regional in its orientation, it seeks to discover the relationship between poetry and landscape in a poetic continuity that stretches from the late 17th century to the present.

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Preamble
1
Along the Line of Smoky Hills The ecology of form in Canadian poetry
15
A Stretching Landscape Some formalistic continuities in the poetry of the hinterland
43
Lawabiding and Lawresisting Baseland and hinterland tendencies in Canadian poetry
77
A Grey Inventory Early long poems on Canada
117
Calibanned The native peoples in early Canadian poetry
143
Of Roses and Rivers and Rattlesnakes and Songless Birds and Trains Towards an ecoanalysis of Canadian poetry
163
The Poem in Its Niche Lampmans The City of the End of Things and its origins
187
Let the Blank Whiteness of the Page Be Snow The paysagepage in preconcrete Canadian poetry
201
Large Stature and Larger Soul The herculean hero and narrative in Canada
217
Passion for Woods and Wild Life Pan and the poets of the Confederation
235
The nth Adam Modernism and the transcendence of Canada
251
AMENDMENT
273
Notes
289
Index
319
Copyright

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Pagina v - How exquisitely the individual Mind (And the progressive powers perhaps no less Of the whole species) to the external World Is fitted: — and how exquisitely, too — Theme this but little heard of among men — The external World is fitted to the Mind; And the creation (by no lower name Can it be called) which they with blended might Accomplish: — this is our high argument.
Pagina 174 - The various terrors of that horrid shore; Those blazing suns that dart a downward ray, And fiercely shed intolerable day; Those matted woods where birds forget to sing; But silent bats in drowsy clusters cling; Those poisonous fields with rank luxuriance crowned, Where the dark scorpion gathers death around; Where at each step the stranger fears to wake The rattling terrors of the vengeful snake...
Pagina 123 - Our own felicity we make or find : * With secret course, which no loud storms annoy, Glides the smooth current of domestic joy. The lifted axe, the agonizing wheel, Luke's iron crown, and Damien's bed of steel, To men remote from power but rarely known, Leave reason, faith, and conscience, all our own.
Pagina 21 - Believe me, Love, this vagrant life O'er Nova Scotia's wilds to roam, While far from children, friends or wife, Or place that I can call a home Delights not me; - another way My treasures, pleasures, wishes lay.
Pagina 25 - FAMILIES, when a child is born Want it to be intelligent. I, through intelligence, Having wrecked my whole life, Only hope the baby will prove Ignorant and stupid. Then he will crown a tranquil life By becoming a Cabinet Minister.
Pagina 132 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme ! Though deep, yet clear; though gentle, yet not dull; Strong without rage, without o'erflowing full.
Pagina 40 - Yonder, toward the left, lie broad the Westmoreland marshes, — Miles on miles they extend, level, and grassy, and dim, Clear from the long red sweep of flats to the sky in the distance, Save for the outlying heights, green-rampired Cumberland Point; Miles on miles outrolled, and the river-channels divide them, — Miles on miles of green, barred by the hurtling gusts.
Pagina 257 - Let me, I beseech thee, Father, die From this fat royal life, and lie As naked as a bridegroom by his bride, And let that girl be the cold goddess Pride. And I will sing to the barren rock Your difficult, lonely music, heart, Like an old proud king in a parable.

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