Women, the State and Revolution: Soviet Family Policy and Social Life, 1917-1936

Voorkant
Cambridge University Press, 26 nov. 1993 - 351 pagina's
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When the Bolsheviks came to power in 1917, they believed that under socialism the family would "wither-away." They envisioned a society in which communal dining halls, daycare centers, and public laundries would replace the unpaid labor of women in the home. Yet by 1936 legislation designed to liberate women from their legal and economic dependence had given way to increasingly conservative solutions aimed at strengthening traditional family ties and women's reproductive role. This book explains the reversal, focusing on how women, peasants, and orphans responded to Bolshevik attempts to remake the family, and how their opinions and experiences in turn were used by the state to meet its own needs.
 

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Inhoudsopgave

Dispensation of cases by the Commissions on
1
Besprizornost and socialized
59
Free union and the wage
101
Stirring the sea of peasant stagnation
144
Drafting a
185
The debate
214
Women versus
254
Abortions and the urban female population
267
Age of women receiving abortions 1926
274
The resurrection of
296
Socialist state law
337
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