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" Yet the man thus corrupt, thus despicable, makes himself necessary to the prince that despises him, by the most pleasing of all qualities, perpetual gaiety, by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged, as his wit is not... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Pagina 187
door William Shakespeare - 1807
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Index to the Works of Shakespeare Giving Topics of Notable Passages and ...

Evangeline Maria O'Connor - 1887 - 419 pagina’s
...despises him, by the most pleasing of all qualities, perpetual gaiety, by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged, as his...ambitious kind, but consists in easy scapes and sallies or levity, which make sport, but raise no envy." — JOHNSON. King Henry the Fifth, which, as promised...
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Wit and Wisdom of Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson, George Birkbeck Norman Hill - 1888 - 323 pagina’s
...despises him by the most pleasing of all qualities, perpetual gaiety, by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged as his...offensive but that it may be borne for his mirth. The moral to be drawn from this representation is, that no H 2 man Wit and Wisdom of Samuel Johnson....
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The Library of Wit and Humor, Prose and Poetry, Selected from the ..., Volume 1

Ainsworth Rand Spofford - 1894
...despises him, by the most pleasing of all qunlities, perpetual gaiety, by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged, as his...sallies of levity, which make sport, but raise no envy." ter throughout three plays, and exhibited him in every variety of situation ; the figure is drawn so...
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Shakespeare Studied in Six Plays

Albert Stratford George Canning - 1907 - 545 pagina’s
...which may be admired, but not esteemed ; of vice which may be despised, but hardly detested. . . . He is stained with no enormous or sanguinary crimes,...licentiousness is not so offensive but that it may be borne with for his mirth." — Johnson's " Notes to Henry IV." Yet, had Johnson really known Falstaff personally,...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 12

William Shakespeare - 1908
...therefore incurred no punishment." And in another place Johnson bids us remember that Falstaff's character is "stained with no enormous or sanguinary crimes,...offensive but that it may be borne for his mirth." On the whole, I am inclined to call this the " backing of your friends." Foreign judgment is harsher,...
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Johnson on Shakespeare: Essays and Notes

Samuel Johnson - 1908 - 206 pagina’s
...despises him, by the most pleasing of all qualities, perpetual gaiety, by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged, as his...the splendid or ambitious kind, but consists in easy escapes and sallies of levity, which make sport but raise no envy. It must be observed that he is stained...
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Shakespeare and His Critics

Charles Frederick Johnson - 1909 - 386 pagina’s
...despises him, by the most pleasing of all qualities, perpetual gaiety, by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged as his...offensive but that it may be borne for his mirth. Remembering, suddenly, his duty to society, the Doctor comes about, and concludes : — The moral to...
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The Living Age, Volume 276

1913
...freely indulged, as his wit is not of the splendid or ambitions kind, but consists in easy scrapes and sallies of levity, which make sport, but raise...stained with no enormous or sanguinary crimes, so that bisl licentiousness is not so offensive but that it may be borne for his mirth." A judgment such as...
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Literary Chapters

Walter Lionel George - 1918 - 241 pagina’s
...despises him, by the most pleasing of all qualities, perpetual gaiety ; by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged, as his...offensive but that it may be borne for his mirth." A judgment such as this one is characteristic of Johnson ; it is elaborate, somewhat prejudiced, and...
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An Outline of Humor: Being a True Chronicle from Prehistoric Ages to the ...

Carolyn Wells - 1923 - 782 pagina’s
...despises him, by the most pleasing of all qualities, perpetual gaiety, by an unfailing power of exciting laughter, which is the more freely indulged, as his...sallies of levity, which make sport, but raise no envy. " One of the most difficult of all poets to quote from, we can only offer detached and fugitive fragments...
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